The hell with Luck I’ll bring the Luck with me.

The Old Man and the Sea was a big success for Ernest Hemingway when it was published in 1952. At first glance, the story appears to be a simple tale of an old Cuban fisherman who catches an enormous fish, only to lose it. But, there’s much more to the story — a tale of bravery and heroism, of one man’s struggle against his own doubts, the elements, a massive fish, sharks and even his desire to give up. The old man eventually succeeds, then fails, and then wins again. It’s the story of perseverance and the machismo of the old man against the elements. This slim novella — it’s only 127 pages — helped to revive Hemingway’s reputation as a writer, winning him great acclaim, including the Nobel Prize for literature.

A man can be destroyed but not defeated.

This is a simple story with deep lessons “Success” is all too often assumed to be the indicator of the value of a man. But success, in and of itself, merely speaks to a particular status and may have nothing to do with the journey that the man took to get there, or whether or not he retained his integrity along the way. Among the many aspects of the story, it is the idea of redefining success and victory that makes The Old Man and the Sea, Ernest Hemingway’s classic novella, so profound.

A man is not made for defeat.

A man does not depend on luck! A man bears pain and hardship without complaint.

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15 thoughts on “Book Review – The Old Man and The Sea

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